Posted on March 31st, 2021

The LinkedIn Strategy That Will Grow Your Business With Rhonda Sher

  • #transform
  • Business
  • Business Goals
  • Business Growth
  • Entrepreneur
  • Goals
  • Leadership
  • LinkedIn
  • Mindset
  • Strategy

The advent of Linkedin allowed professionals the world over to network in a new way. LinkedIn offers unprecedented access to key decision-makers, movers and shakers, potential business partners, service providers and clients. You find someone you like on the platform, and if you want to get to know them, you connect with them and have a call. Sometimes that leads to you joining groups, getting speaking engagements, or invitations to join podcasts.

In one of my podcast episodes, I got the chance to talk with Rhonda Sher, a LinkedIn expert. She’s been helping entrepreneurs, professionals, and businesses create visibility, credibility, and profitability on LinkedIn. She is also the author of the book The ABC’s of LinkedIn, Get LinkedIn or Get Left Out

rhonda-sher-portraithttps://www.rhondasher.com/

Rhonda shared some of her proven LinkedIn strategies that can help you grow your business, and I am sharing them with you.

Professional banner

The banner on your LinkedIn profile is one of the first things people see. As you know, first impressions are everything. The banner is the blue space above the rest of your profile. Make sure your banner reflects your message and your brand. Using Canva.com, you can create a banner consistent with your brand.

jean-ginzburg's-linkedin-banner-and-headshothttps://www.linkedin.com/in/jeanginzburg/

Professional headshot

Your headshot is just as important as your banner. According to Rhonda, people are 16 times more likely to interact with you if you have a professional photo. Don’t be cute with your headshot, and don’t ignore it. A picture of your pet or an avatar will not make you look legitimate in the eyes of a potential client or business partner. Rhonda sees such profiles all the time. Some don’t have any picture at all — Make sure you are not one of them.

Clear and concise headline

LinkedIn will default to giving you your job title in place of your headline. Instead, customize it, using the 220 allowed characters. Use the headline to attract the right prospects. In the headline, tell people what you do, whom you serve, and what problem you solve.

Clear contact information

If you don’t have clear contact information, how do you expect people to get in touch with you? Make sure you list your website, email address, and/or phone number. Not having any contact details is like going to a black-tie event in your running clothes. You are not dressed for the party, and you can’t connect with people the way you would in proper attire. 

Touch 10 people before 10 AM

One of the ways you can increase the efficiency of your time on LinkedIn is by employing Rhonda’s 10 before 10 method. Rhonda asks her clients to make a habit of engaging with at least 10 people before 10 AM. The results might surprise you. For instance, one of her clients gained a 30% increase in business because of this system.

LinkedIn is a platform for serving, not selling

To utilize LinkedIn effectively, first you need to understand what it’s for. It’s not a selling platform. It’s a networking platform, where you can connect with prospects so you can build relationships with them, eventually benefiting from those connections. To help her clients get the most out of the platform, Rhonda teaches them the 3Ps: present, prospect, and profit. It’s a simple system she shares with her clients to generate appointments, share content, interact with other people’s content, engage with prospects, foster connections and profit from them.

 

Connect with Rhonda Sher if you want to learn more about her LinkedIn trade secrets.

Posted on March 22nd, 2021

Retire or Not Retire: That Is the Question

  • #transform
  • Business
  • Business Goals
  • Business Growth
  • Entrepreneur
  • Goals
  • Leadership
  • Mindset
  • Strategy

For a long time, retirement has been regarded as the ultimate goal of a person’s work life. You work so you can retire in comfort. Typically, that would involve a pension and maybe a golden watch from the company you worked for. That is not my situation or the situation of many modern workers. When I think of retirement, I begin to puzzle. At what age? For what reason?

How? Where?

What are the reasons you would want to retire? I came up with these three:

  1. You don’t want to work anymore
  2. You are of age when working is hard
  3. You want to do what you have always wanted to do but postponed till retirement

I’ve tried on these reasons for size and realized that none of them fit me. What about you?

Read on, and let me know how you think of yourself at the typical retirement age and what you would want for yourself.

Reason #1: You don’t want to work anymore

Being an entrepreneur, I cannot wrap my head around the traditional views on retirement. I can’t imagine myself not doing what I love because I turn 65. How would that work? At 64, I am happy to be running a business, helping other entrepreneurs, and at 65, I would stop enjoying it? It doesn’t make sense to me that the age – a number – would dictate when I would stop working.

If you are not enjoying what you are doing, why are you doing it in the first place? It’s not for nothing people keep repeating this quote, attributed to Mark Twain: “Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

If you don’t want to stop doing what you love just because you hit a certain age, what else may make you want to retire?

Reason #2: You are of age when working is hard

The age of 65 has long been regarded as the retirement age. I am sure governments had very good reasons for establishing it. The fact that we do age and our capacity to perform diminishes with age has to be accounted for. But here is where I turn to people such as Dr. David Sinclair for a different perspective. His book Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don’t Have To is a hot commodity these days. It challenges the notion that by 65 most of us walk around with broken bodies and dull minds. Peter Diamandis’ conference Abundance 360 highlights the same message – we are living longer and healthier lives. If that’s the case, why would we not work longer, enjoying doing what we are doing?

By 65, you will have amassed incredible experience; you are still full of energy and vigor; and now you are wise too. I think it would be amazing to see what we can be when we are at the top of our game and still have a long way to go before we feel the need to slow down, whatever our mission.

Once you address the question of needing to retire at 65 because of old age or poor health, since neither may be true for you, what’s left?

Reason #3: You get to do what you always wanted but couldn’t

The final argument is you want to retire so you can finally do the things you want to do! Let me ask you this, then: why are you putting off doing all the things you want to do??? I want to travel now. And I do (minus the COVID situation, of course). If you want to take up a hobby, why wait? What’s stopping you from pursuing the things you want to do? True, maybe you don’t have the time to do everything you want to do right this moment, but if you plan it out over the course of some years, surely you can manage to have the experiences you crave to have before you hit 65.

The question is not whether or not you have the time. The question is how to make it work today.

Conclusion

Once I ran through these three reasons for retirement, I saw that I am not planning on retiring at all. It’s true that life happens, and perhaps I will not be as healthy at 65 as I think I ought to be. But that only ups the stakes for the need to experience life now. By the time I get to that age, it might be too late. Today is all we have, and I don’t want to miss out on all it has to offer because I decided to wait till retirement

Posted on March 11th, 2021

How Long Should My Social Video Be?

  • #transform
  • Business
  • Business Growth
  • Content Marketing
  • Facebook
  • Social Media
  • Strategy
  • Uncategorized

“How long should my social videos be?” From all the presentations I’ve given and all the prospective and actual clients I’ve talked to, it’s the number one question I get asked. 

The answer is it depends. It depends on who you are, what you’re doing, the nature of your business, and, most importantly, whom you want to reach – your target audience and where they are within their buyer’s journey. That’s why before telling you how long your social videos should be, I need to explain what you need to know first.

Where should I post my video?

Post your videos where your audiences are hanging out. 

If your audiences are under the age of 30, TikTok would be a great place to start posting video content. 

For B2B businesses and those working with corporations, LinkedIn is the place to go. 

If your business is about entrepreneurship and you want to reach regular people thinking of setting up their businesses, Facebook and Instagram are good places to post videos. 

If you want to talk to seasoned fellow entrepreneurs, LinkedIn might be a better channel for you.

Relating video length to the funnel

Now back to the question about the length of your videos. 

Every platform has a recommended video length. If you’re on TikTok, you can’t create videos longer than a minute, for example. 

But let’s go beyond that. Before creating your videos, figure out what portion of your target audience you are trying to reach and where they are in your funnel. Their place in your funnel will determine the length of the videos you create for them. 

Top of the funnel – shorter videos

Those at the top of the funnel are people who’ve never heard of you, your brand or your offer.

For such people, who don’t know you but want to learn more about you, 1-2 minute videos work well. They would be willing to invest only a couple of minutes in your content to see what you’re about.

Middle of the funnel – 5-10-minute videos

People in the middle of the funnel are those who know a little bit about you and your offer, seen some of your content or watched some of your videos. 

These people are most likely engaging with, commenting on, and watching your videos. They may be willing to watch more of your content and of longer duration. 

I do 10-minute Facebook Live videos for my business to target people in the middle of my funnel. These audiences already know who I am and then see the specific content I create for them.

Bottom of the funnel – longer videos

And, of course, the bottom of the funnel is where conversions happen. 

You are safe to create longer videos for this portion of your target audience. These can be your courses, training, and webinars. Design those videos to prompt your viewers to take a specific action – whether it’s filling out a lead, getting on a call, or subscribing to a newsletter.

Conclusion

The length of your social videos should match (1) the requirements of the channel you are posting on and (2) where your target audience is within your funnel. Create 1-2 minutes videos for people at the top of the funnel. Create 5-10 minutes for people in the middle of the funnel. And create longer videos for people at the bottom of the funnel to increase conversions.

 

If you’re not sure if you and your brand – whether it’s your personal or company brand – are getting enough exposure through video content check out THIS blog on the Best Tips on How to Get Past Your Shyness with Video